Isle of Wight adventure. 

Appropriate I guess.  

Transport for the boy and his cow.

Transport for the boy and his cow.

Shroo Landscaping Project: Part 3

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These fences are solid. We chose slotted concrete posts with close board panels for longevity. I really don’t want to be putting in new posts in my lifetime! Plus, close board panels look the shiz.  

Here’s what our previous fences looked like:image

J: It was so easy to remove the old fences, I’m pretty sure a farting Pigeon could have knocked the panels down. Although it’s fairly straight forward, I’ll admit here that I didn’t know what I was doing. A friend of the Shroos lent me the tools and gave me some pro advice. Basically put in a string line to guide path of the fences and keep your spirit level handy!

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J: The posts are 8ft. Gravel board 6 inches and panel 5.6ft. Total of 6ft fence will give plenty of height. Using a post hole digger made it effort less in the wet ground. I broke the old fence post concrete foundation with the breaker. Easy. It’s a pain if you dig too deep or too little because lifting the posts in and out gets boring. Fast.

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J: I used Postcrete to set the posts. It’s quick drying so make sure you get the spirit level ready to adjust. 

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A pro bit of advice: Drive some wooden pegs to screw the gravel boards against. This will give you a nice and level to work with and give the panel something steady to sit on. These can be taken out later when you’ve leveled underneath. 

Full disclosure: I messed up the line for the fences on the right hand side and had to DIG OUT A POST. That’s right, dig out the post including the already set postcrete. Live and learn. Don’t judge it by eye.

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DIY: Window Box

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I needed a break with all the fencing and garden landscaping. Kate really wanted a window box for her beloved 'juicy grape' potting shed but she couldn’t find one a) wide enough b) the right colour!

So here’s one we made to suit her potting shed… a nice little weekend project. 

For the plant box I preferred the trapezium style - tapering at the base, plenty of room for the flowers. Although a bit more work the extra cuts were worth it.

Dimensions W1200mm H120mm D144mm. I just bought some planned redwood  locally. I settled on a 15° angle, you’re gonna need to set the saw to the angle and rip down the board for the front of the box. 

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Glue up was reinforced with 4x40mm wood screws. (make sure to counter sink so you can use filler to cover them up). When cutting the ends, it has to be the same angle as the front 15°. It was simple enough to cut by hand. I used the knife wall method with cross cuts.

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Even though I checked the boards on purchase, one ended up a little cupped. It shouldn’t be too much of a problem - just make sure to glue and clamp - I added more screws for good measure. 

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Using the same board, just make a template for suitable bracket. I just used a paint tin for the radius. Use a jig saw to cut out the shape and then I used a flush trim bit in the router to make a clone copy. sand down whilst clamped together to get 2 equal brackets. imageI used a cove bit on the router for a fancy decorative edge, made the brackets stand out better. The bracket will need to be long enough to be flush with the top of the box. Then you drive screws though the box and into the bracket to secure on the shed. 

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Make sure you use filler over any visable screws before sanding. I used 80 then 120 grit and stopped there because we were going to paint with primer and outdoor suitable paint. it’s helpful to put in drainage holes too! Kate chose Cuprinol off white which is the same range she painted the shed with. Outdoor suitable!

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Well, now the breaks over, best get on and finish the garden!

Custom pickle wrapping paper! #fathersday

Custom pickle wrapping paper! #fathersday